#Bookreview – They call me Mom by Pete Springer

Book reviews

What Amazon says

Who Will You Inspire Today? Teachers face this challenge and responsibility each day, but in the process, the author discovers that his students can also have a profound influence on him. Pete Springer takes you on his memorable thirty-one-year journey in education as an elementary school teacher and offers the many valuable life and teaching lessons he learned along the way. Get ready to laugh out loud at some of the humorous and memorable experiences that all teachers face, feel inspired by the inherent goodness of children, and appreciate the importance of developing a sense of teamwork among the staff. Learn valuable tips for working with children, parents, fellow staff members, and administrators. This book is ideal for young teachers, but also a reminder to all educators of the importance and responsibility of being a role model. This book is a must-read for all new teachers and those teachers that need a reminder they are human! Mr. Springer educates others in his easy-to-read, story-like, first-hand manuscript. You will laugh, cry, and get motivated to be the best educator you can. After reading this, I have a better outlook on relationships with my colleagues and am reminded to savor every moment. -Tami Beall (Principal, Pine Hill School)

My review

They Call Me Mom is a delightful book detailing the teaching experiences of life-long teacher, Pete Springer, in a school in a government school in the USA. This memoir is an interesting, and sometimes poignant, peek into the teaching environment and provides some memorable insights into some of the practical and emotional difficulties a teacher experiences.

Pete depicts his initial decision not to go to college and study straight after finishing school, but rather to do some unskilled jobs. These jobs did not pan out well for Pete and after returning home and working as an assistant in a special needs school, he decided to go into teaching as a profession. This was the perfect choice for him and he evolved into a caring and dedicated teacher.

Pete was fortunate to have some wonderful role models to help him develop as a professional and, I am sure, he was also a fabulous role model to new teachers coming into the system. He inspired some of his students to consider teaching as a career and that is a great achievement.

The book is filled with endearing stories about Pete’s classroom experiences with the children and the reader quickly comes to realise that there is a lot more to being a good teacher than knowing the curriculum and preparing lessons. Their is also the social and emotional side where teachers must understand the issues and problems their students are experiencing and help guide them through these difficult times. Pete had exposure to a far greater range of family backgrounds than I ever have, either during my own school career or that of my two sons. He had students whose parents worked at night, some whose parents went to jail and others who were being raised by single parents or grandparents.

This book provides a lot of guidance to teachers about how to maximize the learning environment in the classroom and this information is useful to all carers of children including parents, grandparents and others.

A lovely book and one that focuses on the important role played by teachers in raising the next generation of parents, employees and business leaders.

Purchase They call me Mom

About Pete Springer

I’m a retired elementary teacher (31 years) who will always be a strong advocate for children, education, and teachers. My favorite thing to do as a teacher was to read to my students, and now I’m following my heart and writing children’s books for middle grades.

Contact Pete Springer

Blog: https://petespringerauthor.wordpress.com/

 

 

97 thoughts on “#Bookreview – They call me Mom by Pete Springer

    1. Thanks, Ritu. I sure enjoyed Marriage Unarranged. You are a talented writer. I found your acknowledgments to be particularly moving as we all need encouragement from those close to us.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I enjoy following Pete’s blog and I am sure I shall enjoy reading this. It is good to go out into the world first before you decide your vocation. I didn’t, just followed my friends to teachers’ college and only lasted a year teaching, but was left with great respect for teachers!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. My respect for teachers and teaching is growing by the day at the moment, Janet. My boys are both being home schooled via virtual classrooms by their school. What a lot of work has gone into setting all of this up and keeping all the boys going with their education.

      Liked by 4 people

    2. It’s an interesting time to be a teacher these days, Janet. The kids come to us much greater challenges than people of our generation faced. Watching how teachers have responded during this virus outbreak has been inspiring. I’m not surprised, but it makes me proud to be part of such a committed profession.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. My son-in-law is a teacher at a ‘pupil referral unit’ with teenagers other schools don’t want and their families aren’t much interested in them either. They work so hard to get the pupils engaged in education and suddenly school’s closed!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m running out of buttons, so I hope you see this, Janet. Your son-in-law is a rock star in my book. It’s heartbreaking to think that there are kids out there who have trouble finding a school that accepts them. I can almost guarantee their anger stems from something awful that has happened to them.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. The most telling and special thing for me as a retired teacher is that I continue to stay in touch with many of my former students. Some of my first students are now in their mid-forties, which is rather mind-blowing.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you, Jill. Robbie is one of the hardest working and most giving bloggers that I know. The fact that she holds down a fulltime job is an active mother and still makes time to read and write each day demonstrates her commitment to her craft.

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Thank you, Beth. It’s always great to meet a fellow educator. I’ve seen your name on many of the same blogs that I follow. If I remember correctly, you teach young children, too. (preschool?) My wife was a longtime preschool teacher and then director.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the kind comments, Darlene. I look forward to reading another Amanda book soon. You have found a unique way to tell a story while incorporating wonderful history lessons.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I have had the great fortune of working with some amazing educators. One of my former principals is eighty-one, part of my writing critique group, and an incredible role model who still volunteers in schools.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Lovely review, Robbie. I enjoy Pete’s blog and I’m sure his students loved being in his classrooms. Great book for times like these, when we’re all appreciating teachers even more than usual.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The level of commitment to their students during this crisis speaks volumes to their passion. I’ve seen many teachers finding creative ways to teach kids and setting up youtube channels to read to their students at night.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. Thank you for visiting and commenting, Amy. The teachers at my sons school are working and giving on-line lessons at the moment. I am really relieved because I would have to organise the lessons as well as supervise them otherwise.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Thank you so much for your support and comprehensive review, Robbie. I’ve met so many wonderful people in the past year since I started blogging. I think it is so cool that you have written books with your oldest son. Imagine when he becomes a father someday and passes his creativity and love for writing on to his children.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. HI Pete, I have written a book with my mom too. It is a real family undertaking. I have discovered that doing these things as a family is a super way of encouraging reading, writing and good family times together. I am glad you liked my review. I enjoyed your book very much.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I remember that. Can you refresh my memory about which book that is? It’s hard to keep up with all of the things you’ve got going on.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Haha, Pete, I like to keep busy. The book I co-authored with my mom is called While the Bombs Fell and is a fictionalised memoir of my mom’s childhood growing up in a small English town during WWII. It is aimed at older children and is intended to help them understand what life was like at this time.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I’d like to give my two thumbs up for Pete’s book as well, which I am about 80% of the way through. As Robbie points out, this will be quite a useful book for new teachers. I’d also recommend Pete’s blog!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for your years of service in education, Betty. Isn’t it wonderful to see some of our students become leaders of the next generation?

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I think most jobs get easier over time, Liz, but I didn’t feel that way with teaching. The kids became more challenging (often the product of difficult home situations), your hands are tied in terms of discipline, and there are fewer resources. I think in many ways it is harder to be a teacher now. At the same time, I’d do it all over again in a heartbeat if I could.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I taught writing process and critical inquiry courses to students in the special education teacher certification track, and as the years went by, the students became increasingly concerned about the emphasis on standardized testing. (Most of the students were paraeducators already working in the schools.)

        Liked by 1 person

    2. You must be a brave soul, Liz. Anyone who can teach special education or English to eighth-graders deserves a medal. I laughed at your comment about wanting them to act their age. My school went from K-6 to K-3 in the middle of my career. I used to look at my third-grade boys who were still falling out of their chairs by the middle of the year and think, “And this is our future and the best we have to offer?”🤣🤣 Sometimes you just have to laugh.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m so appreciative to have met you, Norah, and to connect with educators around the world. It is fascinating to me to see what is going on in other countries around the world.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It is fascinating. I must tell you now while I think of it, Pete. After I recommended your book in one of my posts, one of my teacher friends purchased it for her step daughter who was in her second-year of teaching. You never know how far your wisdom spreads. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for visiting, Michael. I agree that teaching is not only about sharing knowledge. Some clever people share knowledge but don’t get their students to understand what they are saying which makes it a useless task. A good teacher is so important.

      Like

      1. Think so, Pete! This way iave some experiences from former study colleagues too, but here most things for teaching is so predicted, you normally cant escape, wthout stress. Hope the will liberate it, ofter the experiences of online teaching. Best wishes, and stay save! Michael.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Debby. I get the impression that you are feeling better Hope you’re feeling more like yourself now. It sure feels like we’re in this for the long haul.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I only taught elementary school, but I felt like my job was always part educator and part showman. It’s a bit like being a magician as you have to find ways to hold their attention. High school teachers can make the most significant impact.

      Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s